netflix kanye documentary

Netflix Kanye Documentary Jeen-Yuhs Is a Heartbreaking Ode to the Old Kanye

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Netflix Kanye Documentary – Every day in the month of March, a brand new Kanye headline has landed on the shores with each one more shocking and disturbing than the one before. He has posted Kim’s plea messages, urging them to keep their conversations secret; he invites the alleged rapist Marilyn Manson into his creative group to begin work on Donda 2.

Even the smallest of his nitpicks –threatening to cancel Coachella until Billie Eilish makes an apology in a letter to Travis Scott, for instance–reek of imperial rot that is the career of a famous person that is in its last spiritual in the throes of.

For those who are truly committed the truly determined, a fall from grace is never going to hit the bottom. Kanye isn’t a problem if determined. It’s a mind-numbing experience and often appears that the best option is to simply walk away.

What kind of time is that, in reality, to jeen-yuhs jeen-yuhs, a four-and-a-half-hour Netflix documentary that reverses the clock back towards the start? (The documentary will air in three separate parts over the coming days, and the initial part launching today.)

It’s not even Kanye seems to be willing to be celebrating the film’s release. Despite asking that the filmmakers “open the editing room” to protect his image, which is a depressing possibility, he seems to be at a peace regarding the film. If Kanye had chosen to play the cards differently jeen-yuhs would be a win-win.

netflix kanye documentary
Netflix Kanye Documentary

But he’s been insisting on losing hands so much that the film instead appears to be a love letter that is resurfacing in an unsettling custody battle. The only thing that is clear is how much was lost.

The most important aspect I could say of jeen-yuhs is that it’s a must to watch, especially if been struggling with his behavior and words over the past five years. The film is directed by clarence “Coodie” Simmons, who is our character in the tale, speaking long segments of his soothing drawl.

A comedian and public access TV host who established an enviable name in Chicago’s hip-hop scene of the ’90s, Coodie first noticed Kanye at the age of 21 when he was a local producer.

Also Read: Kanye West Sweet Jesus Mp3 Song download |Jesus Is King

Attracted by the fidgety kid’s desire to become the beatmaker and performer, Coodie decides to follow him around for a few minutes and considers the possibility of a Hoop Dreams-style documentary about achieving it despite every obstacle.

The story Coodie is trying to tell us is about how he received more than he anticipated. Kanye did not just achieve his goal, but continued going, far above what anyone would have imagined was possible.

Coodie is portrayed as someone who is knowledgeable about the subject and has witnessed the forces that motivate him during the most vulnerable of moments. In the two-thirds portion of his constantly mangled interesting, enthralling, and disturbing documentary, that’s precisely the person he is: a trusted daily source who records Kanye’s movements at an hour when there’s no rational reason for doing it.

A fun-running theme that is evident, at least at the beginning of the show, is the number of curious questions Kanye is asked about the guy who is filming. “This guy is making an interview regarding me,” Kanye explains, repeatedly, and the astonishment of everyone increases: you?

It’s still awe-inspiring to support this underdog version of Kanye, a genuine and amiable guy with talent that is obvious and who sings the “Benz as well as a bag” songs for bored Roc-A-Fella office drones and takes 10 minutes in studio space from the other performers in order to make time for his indefinitely canceled debut.

In one instance when he’s with his friends, he invites them over to visit his mother and it’s quite amazing to see how gently and quickly Donda gently humbly accosts her son. Every time she speaks, Kanye drops his head–his respect is instantaneous and natural. “The massive stares at his reflection and doesn’t see anything,” she counsels him. She sits in silence and watches him struggle to bear the weight of this knowledge Then she begins laughing. Humility isn’t easy for him.

The first two episodes contain a number of adorable moments that are tragic in their simplicity. In the first, Kanye waits outside of Ludacris’s studio, hoping Ludacris will be able to make a catchy song hook for the upcoming album The college dropout.

Luda isn’t to be seen and, as Kanye sits in a tense hall, he catches the child who is bored to ask if he’s heard of the hits of Jay-Z’s “Izzo (H.O.V.A. ).” “I created every single joint,” he informs the child, hoping. “Cool,” the kid thinks, naively and then scurries off.

In another song, Kanye is able to convince Jay-Z to allow him to sing an appearance in ” The Bounce,” from 2002’s The Blueprint 2. In an attempt to convince the Roc-A-Fella execs to accept him as a rapper.

The rapper then delivers an absolutely terrible line that includes a mind-numbingly poor Shrek reference directly to his idol at the controls. However, his conviction is so intoxicating that it wakes Jay who coaches an incredibly nervous Kanye at the recording studio line by line.

In the playback, Kanye twirls in his chair, gazing up towards the sky. “Just a long way from playing rap in my mom’s crib,” Kanye mutters with a dreamlike tone.

For more than an hour, jeen-yuhs lingers with awe on the tense time prior to his debut album. It’s almost like you can sense Coodie and his director partner Chike trying to not take a long look at the music of the next song. They’d rather stay together with “Old Kanye,” the one we began to shed the moment we learned of his name.

After the College Dropout is out and the Grammys begin to roll in, Coodie recedes from Kanye’s life. The whiplash can be confusing, for Coodie and us. The second episode ends by rewinding the subsequent decade intense blur–“You don’t have any answers” along with “Imma let you go” and “That seems like a good idea” all in just one bloody Cuisinart. The dreadful feeling begins to creep in and the scene will be set jeen-yuhs final, lonely conclusion.

The sense that Coodie isn’t sure which direction to take in the past many years of Kanye’s life is evident. Like many others He’s lost and confused while viewing Kanye’s show on his phone. Kanye Show from his phone.

He and Kanye are only able to meet in the course of Kanye’s amazing run, which spans beginning with graduation to The Life of Pablojeen-yuhs quickly becomes a record of unrequited love, and about the people that we’ve left behind.

In 2017 Kanye invites Coodie and his camera back to his life, but much of footage from the more recent time is so painful that you’d almost wish he didn’t. When he’s creating Jesus is King, Kanye holds forth on his adherence to Trump and God’s plan and his brand new music as a group of snobbery-minded fans look at him in the absence of predatory felines. “I’ve had all kinds of family members around me,” Kanye says, only briefly mentions Coodie however, this casual observation only confirms how utterly lonely he is. His wife and children are during this time or even appear as they pass by in the distance.

While Kanye performs his ever-more bizarre business in his increasingly bizarre world, he frequently makes reference to mental health concerns. A few of the references are funny for instance when he tells the designers in a group how the shoe he designs for him to appear slimmer due to the fact that his weight is 35 pounds higher due to the medication he takes.

Some of them are terrifying, terrifying. “Have you been confined, say, in handcuffs and taken in a hospital because you had a brain that was large in your head?” he asks at one point and yelling at the unholy calm of potential real estate partners of his firm, who appear like they just came back from human blood transfusions. “No? Okay, I’ve got it.” He continues to inform them that he was taking medication so it would allow him to “turn alien into English,” and grows more and more agitated and incoherent.

When the camera’s developers look at Coodie with cool, smug disdain, Coodie does the only good thing. He shuts off the camera.

The documentary concludes in the summer of Donda listening events, Coodie resorts to cliche. “Even in all the changes I remember myself that I turned the camera on just 21 years before,” the director says without conviction.

It is clear that he is struggling to find a meaningful peaceful note to conclude his life’s work. However, a lifetime’s work does not go in a linear fashion. It breaks down and it is corrected. The majority of your life’s work can be described as fiction that is driving you. For Coodie it’s watching Kanye.

For Kanye his idea about “life’s work” appears to have changed into a pathogen that has been ravaging him on the inside. Whatever else is mentioned on jeen-yuhs–its absence of coverage, or its lack of objectiveness–it’s difficult to watch it and not feel anything.

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